5 Sayings Most People Get Wrong

by ConnectingSingles.com | Feb 19, 2009 | Posted in: Language

5 Sayings Most People Get Wrong

There are five sayings that too many people are guilty of misquoting. Some of these sayings are said incorrectly so frequently that the wrong versions are gaining more popularity and acceptance than the originals. While language is a changing and evolving thing, unfortunately many of the new versions make little sense. It's a good idea to know the correct ones, so that you aren't caught unprepared in an embarrassing, misquoting situation. So whether you use them, share them, or entirely disregard them, knowing the true sayings never hurt anyone.

I could care less

The first saying on the list is "I could care less." While there are probably a million things you could care less about, the actual saying goes "I couldn't care less." Though the difference in structure is minute, the difference in meaning is vast. There is the possibility of a miscommunication with this one, but more importantly the first just doesn't make sense in the context it's said. You say "I couldn't care less" to imply that the situation is something to which you are thoroughly indifferent. The misquotation intimates quite the opposite.

one in the same

The second offender is saying something is "one in the same" when you actually mean that it's "one and the same." This one is a little confusing. Unlike the first, this faux saying doesn't mean anything at all. What on earth does it mean to be "one in the same?" Perhaps people are attempting to imply that something is a small part of the same whole, but the world will be a happier place if people agree that something is "one and the same" as something else.

nip it in the butt

The third saying is the ever-present "nip it in the butt." Now, obviously biting someone in the posterior would probably halt unwanted behavior, but the actual saying is "nip it in the bud." Nipping something while it's a bud means that it cannot grow into something more offensive. You cut the annoyance before it develops into a much larger problem. Unless you actually want to find the butt of a problem and bite it, perhaps it's a good idea to start saying "bud." Furthermore, it's just more polite to refrain from talking about behinds!

with all intensive purposes

The fourth problem quotations is "with all intensive purposes." The problem with this saying, although it might be possible to have intensive purposes, is that the actual saying is "with all intents and purposes." Granted, intents and purposes are really the same thing and may sound a bit redundant, but intensive purposes is just plain incorrect. Fortunately, if you say the false rendition quickly enough, there are few people who are likely to notice your gaffe. Whether or not your purposes are intensive, it's best to remember the correct version.

you've got another thing coming

The fifth, and most common, misquoted saying is "you've got another thing coming." You've probably never even heard the correct version, but it's "you've got another think coming." If you feel like impressing friends, coworkers, or stranger with your knowledge, feel free to point out to them the entire sayings goes "if that's what you think, you've got another think coming." The true saying really only makes sense in it's entirety. For this reason, many have proposed that the off-shoot "you've got another thing coming," be recognized as a valid saying in it's own right. People may look at you strangely for using the true saying.

So there you have it. Five sayings have now been clarified, so do with them what you will. You can now go out into the world proclaiming the true statements, secure in your knowledge that the correct words are spilling from your lips. And if someone thinks to correct your strange words, you can proudly point out their own misinformation. So loudly declare that someone has "another think coming" or that you "couldn't care less." Spread your knowledge wisely and use your powers for good.

Comments

  • Redex
    Fri Oct 9, 2009 12:08 PM CST

    Redex

    Chichesters, Northumberland, England UK

    professor Ahhhh youve spoilt my jokes nowtongue lips

  • Mon Oct 12, 2009 2:57 AM CST

    Profile Deleted

    most people???? iv heard all of the above sayings, but im afraid iv never heard them said like that. anyone who gets them wrong must be retarded

  • Tue Oct 13, 2009 2:56 PM CST

    Sreich

    Clermont Ferrand, Centre France

    The fourth saying should be "TO all intents and purposes".

  • Thu Apr 1, 2010 7:22 PM CST

    jonnt

    Lost in the Woods, East Sussex, England UK

    Would anybody dare go out in your company hoping to have a nice chilled out evening ,, i surrender , ooops must leave help me Airoplanes waiting rolling on the floor laughing catch up with you aggen

  • Mon Apr 12, 2010 1:02 PM CST

    Profile Deleted

    another misquote...money is the root of all evil...wrong the love of money is the root of all evilwow

  • AustralianGirlAU
    Thu Apr 4, 2013 4:07 PM CST

    AustralianGirlAU

    Izmir, Mediterranean Turkey

    two more for you

    Money is the root of all evil Misquoted Dickens

    'For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.'

    Dickenes said the Love of money.

    15 minutes of fame misquoted Warhol

    In March 1968, Andy Warhol stated, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes."
    According to Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, when Warhol made the statement, he was referring to the chain of command that allowed only certain people to be recognized. Warhol was envisioning the day when the chain would not exist and this broken chain would allow everybody an equal chance at fame.
    -think about social media and I believe he is right - visionalry and a stirrer

  • drankhei
    Fri Apr 5, 2013 12:13 PM CST

    drankhei

    Canton, Illinois USA

    Wow, that was interesting to learn i've been messing those up for years. I am no longer a tard now-thank you!

  • Catfoot
    Sat Apr 6, 2013 3:57 PM CST

    Catfoot

    Around here, Cape Town South Africa

    Hmm, the first four I use correctly, but the last I cannot recall ever having used it. But I would have been wrong! I will try to imlement this correctly if I get to use it. Thanks!

  • SASingleGuy
    Sun Apr 7, 2013 9:26 PM CST

    SASingleGuy

    San Antonio, Texas USA

    Actually number four is an antiquated legal term. When you sold or leased land to someone you could (and still can if you own all rights including water, mineral, etc.) sell or lease them all the land, or for specific intents and purposes. In this context intents and purposes are different things. If you only leased with a specific intent you may only use it for that purpose. If you leased for all intents and purposes, however, you may use it for the specific intent stated in the contract and for any other legal purpose. You may be liable, however, if you used the land in such a way that diminished the value of the land if that use was not stated in the specific intent of the contract. The term is really not used anymore since land contracts are small books and every eventuality is accounted for in the terms of the contract.