Philosophical Fiction

I have created a new avant gardist genre of fiction called Philosophical fiction. Philosophical fiction is post-post modern fiction. Philosophical fiction departs from the conventional modes of storytelling. There are no stories to tell anymore. There is also no plot line.
By using the mode of Philosophical Fiction, I have created an oeuvre called the Guernica. Philosophical fiction has been heavily influenced by the art movement of Picasso that is Cubism. Philosophical Fiction also incorporates the rhythms of Jazz. Here I leave an excerpt from the novel Guernica:


Philosophical fiction redefines aesthetics with the narrative incorporating the Baroque and the Blues. Philosophical fiction is the highest form, a novel can attain art. Various philosophical themes are examined through the literary motifs of art. Thus Philosophical fiction is a post-post modern, a poetic symphony of prose in narratives. In philosophical fiction the author and characters merge. Narratives in Philosophical Fiction draw heavily on the symbolism of tropes. Tropes are music in the language of poetry. Various themes of nature have been romanticized into an eclectic language of poetic prose. Philosophical fiction is a post-post modern adaption of the art of nouveau roman. The author in Philosophical fiction also indulges in the rich usage of the technique of the pastiche. Philosophical fiction uses the romantic language of the past with a postmodern fictional touch. Philosophical fiction is the art of impressionism of words, the art of cubist prose and the expressionism of the romantic. Philosophical fiction takes into account various philosophical themes and weaves them in a rich density of literary inter-textuality.

Comments (18)

pat8lanips
Yeah it sounds pretty good, do you have any examples of your work?
Kattte
Lovely; Allan Ginsberg meets and recites Bach ....pure electric sandwiches...applause
nonsmoker
suffering sesquipedalian;
you're cranium seems a bit elevated upon the interior of your own exterior posterior conversing
Cachuchi
Bazinga!!!!! Nonsmoker applause

My 2 cents using donuts.... Hope M.P likes it grin

nonsmoker
Cach,
They forgot Homer,

"Sacrilicious"
Cachuchi
D´OH! Non!!!!! you are right! roll eyes

M.P & M.P should create a change.org petition on his behalf cool
you're older than you look, then, if you created Philosophical Fiction wow

Extract from Wiki ...


This is only a list of some major philosophical fiction. For all philosophical novels, see Category:Philosophical novels.
There is no universally accepted definition of philosophical fiction, but a sampling of notable works can help to outline its history.

Some philosophers write novels, plays, or short fiction in order to demonstrate or introduce their ideas. Common examples include: Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ayn Rand, Albert Camus, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Authors who admire certain philosophers may incorporate their ideas into the principal themes or central narratives of novels. Some examples include: The Moviegoer (Kierkegaard), Wittgenstein's Mistress (Wittgenstein), and Speedboat (post-structuralism).

A special case is that of Plato's Socratic dialogues. While possibly based on real events, it is widely accepted that with a few exceptions (the most likely being the Apology), the dialogues were entirely Plato's creation. On the other hand, the "plots" of these dialogues consist of men discussing philosophical matters, so the degree to which they fall into what moderns would recognize as "fiction" is unclear.

Author Name Date Notes
St. Augustine De Magistro 4th century Early example
Abelard Dialogue of a Philosopher with a Jew and a Christian 12th century Early example
Ibn Tufail Philosophus Autodidactus 12th century Early example
Yehuda Halevi The Kuzari 12th century Early example; Arabic
Voltaire Zadig 1747 Early example
Voltaire Candide 1759 Early example
J.-J. Rousseau Julie, or the New Heloise 1761 Early example
James Hogg The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner 1824
Walter Pater Marius the Epicurean 1885
Thomas Carlyle Sartor Resartus 1833-34 Canonical
Goethe Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship 1795-96 Canonical
Leo Tolstoy War and Peace 1869 Canonical
Robert Musil The Man Without Qualities 1930-43 Canonical
Milan Kundera The Unbearable Lightness of Being 1984
Aldous Huxley After Many a Summer 1939
Aldous Huxley Island 1962
C.S. Lewis Space Trilogy 1938, 1943, 1945
Søren Kierkegaard Diary of a Seducer 1843 A novel in the highly literary philosophical work Either/Or.
Friedrich Nietzsche Thus Spoke Zarathustra 1885 Perhaps the most well-known example of a modern philosophical novel.
Leo Tolstoy Resurrection 1899
Samuel Beckett Waiting for Godot 1952 One of the most well-known philosophical plays of the twentieth century.
Louis-Ferdinand Céline Journey to the End of the Night 1932
Marcel Proust In Search of Lost Time 1913–1927
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry The Little Prince 1943
André Malraux Man's Fate 1933
Thomas Mann The Magic Mountain 1924
Franz Kafka The Trial 1925
George Orwell Animal Farm 1945 A critique of Stalinist style socialism.
George Orwell 1984 1949 A critique of totalitarianism as well as a discourse on the manipulative use of language.
Philip K. d*ck Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? 1968
Philip K. d*ck A Scanner Darkly 1977
Philip K. d*ck VALIS 1981 A novel version of his longer non-fiction book The Exegesis, outlining his intense interest in the nature of reality, metaphysics and religion.
Jean-Paul Sartre Nausea 1938
Jean-Paul Sartre No Exit 1944 An existentialist play outlining Sartrean philosophy.
Jean-Paul Sartre The Devil and the Good Lord 1951 An existentialist play outlining Sartrean philosophy.
Simone de Beauvoir She Came to Stay 1943 An existential novel outlining Simone de Beauvoir's philosophy.
Simone de Beauvoir Les Bouches inutiles (fr) 1944 An existential play outlining Simone de Beauvoir's philosophy.
Simone de Beauvoir All Men are Mortal 1946 An existential novel outlining Simone de Beauvoir's philosophy.
nonsmoker
Biff,
That's what I meant in my first post laugh
Homer - : "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"
Non, my love, it could be that the position of his cranium, which I believe you have exactly to rights, accounts for his youthful appearance which, under the circumstances, is truly incredible

I'm ever so tempted to claim I created whodunits, though.

cool
Biff, youdunnit laugh
nonsmoker
Who doughnuts! laugh
Cachuchi
Our Angela Lansbury !!!!! applause

Where is Ash by the way?
I did, I surely did laugh yay
Kattte
Elegsabiff•24 hrs ago•Motril-ish, Spain
you're older than you look, then, if you created Philosophical Fiction wow

Extract from Wiki ...


"This is only a list of some major philosophical fiction. For all philosophical novels, see Category:Philosophical novels.
There is no universally accepted definition of philosophical fiction, but a sampling of notable works can help to outline its history.

Some philosophers write novels, plays, or short fiction in order to demonstrate or introduce their ideas. Common examples include: Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ayn Rand, Albert Camus, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Authors who admire certain philosophers may incorporate their ideas into the principal themes or central narratives of novels. Some examples include: The Moviegoer (Kierkegaard), Wittgenstein's Mistress (Wittgenstein), and Speedboat (post-structuralism).

A special case is that of Plato's Socratic dialogues. While possibly based on real events, it is widely accepted that with a few exceptions (the most likely being the Apology), the dialogues were entirely Plato's creation. On the other hand, the "plots" of these dialogues consist of men discussing philosophical matters, so the degree to which they fall into what moderns would recognize as "fiction" is unclear....."


Not bad at all...off-hand I could add Allen Ginsberg with his epic "HOWL' as it has several layers and jumps from one to another; one also needs a dictionary of Metaphors and perhaps one for Euphemisms also but alas, no one has yet written one; a good source for meanings of metaphors can be found in most art type books outlining the symbolic meanings of most fruits, flowers, objects and even colours that appear as "props" in most paintings from the Middle Ages to the 'temporary-contemporary' works of today. The meanings haven't changed.
The other two major writers missing are Jack Kerouac and H.P. Lovecraft 'high priest' of the truly weird philosophies/ theologies...He is a must to be included. wine
psiberite
I would like to thank all the readers for your enriching comments. I am an exhilarated being animated with the consciousness of your dialogues,
Kattte
All the above has already been done and expressed from the early days of the Dadaists, in verse, free verse, musical scores, songs and even ballets and films; same with aural Cubism. See some of the films by Dali or the noted Dada artists from the 1920's in German and French. Many compositions embracing all manner of Surrealism were done for the "Film Noir" genre, a mostly French style of film, later taken up by some American film makers in the late 30's to mid 40's. In the 1950's it was again taken up by some Hollywood producers that did films on and about the Beat Generation and incorporating the Jazz Be-Bop lingo of the late 40's right up to the mid 60's . One singer Cleo Lane was really quite versed in singing it and her albums sold rather well as did recordings of Dada type poetry. See all of the films by Dali. They are both hilarious and "far out" as the saying went. It may open your mind as to what took place before you came to be. Explore the past before you declare a future as it has either been tried and done before. There is nothing new under the proverbial sun; things just recycle over time.yawn
I lost interest in Dada when I saw the hair growing on a spoon.
I was hoping this blog might offer a breakthrough into the sublime and offer a new visual universe for artists and humanity.
runningshiva: "IS THIS JUSTIFIED ?!?"(meet us in the quizzes)

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