Cultural etiquette ( Archived) (39)

Nov 25, 2007 7:03 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
Every country has it's own etiquette, for instance is tolerance, kindness to each other and independence are highly valued here in Norway.
I came across a site, and I found that the norwegian "rules" were quite accurate to they way we live here...

Like:
-There is little personal touching except between relatives and close friends.
-Shake hands with everyone present--men, women and children--at a business or social meeting. Shake hands again when leaving.


Other countries have their own etiquette like (still according to this site):

Danes insist on punctuality for social occasions.
Generally, Swedes are reserved in body language. They do not embrace or touch often in public.
Do not stand close to a Norwegian, back slap or put your arm around anyone.
Finns do not make small talk; they get right to business.


When going to a foreign country do you consider and/or respect these things at all??
Do you look into it before you go??
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Nov 25, 2007 7:07 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Dknew
DknewDknewBarrington, New Hampshire USA319 Threads 14 Polls 9,166 Posts
Don't think there is any etiquette in the US grin jaw drop
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Nov 25, 2007 7:07 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
Every year I have French exchange students come to stay (and my kids go there)

My daughter (13) FREEZES when the 'gorgeous' 14 yr old French boy comes in and kisses her on both cheeks..

she looks like this >> blushing blushing blushing blushing

and my 11yr old son.. goes..

Ermm.. HEY BUDDY! (before the French boy can get close enough) handshake


haha
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Nov 25, 2007 7:07 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
rolling on the floor laughing rolling on the floor laughing
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Nov 25, 2007 7:08 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
You'd be surprised, the list was quite long... laugh
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Nov 25, 2007 7:09 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
What does it say for England Oslo?

wave
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Nov 25, 2007 7:09 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Dknew
DknewDknewBarrington, New Hampshire USA319 Threads 14 Polls 9,166 Posts
Well we do need to be reminded not to pee in public when we go out roll eyes laugh
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Nov 25, 2007 7:10 PM CST Cultural etiquette
evie_girl_fl
evie_girl_flevie_girl_flFayetteville, North Carolina USA11 Threads 1,361 Posts
why cant a person stand too close to a Norwegian? Is it because they are wary of strangers or they claustophobic? confused
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Nov 25, 2007 7:10 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
laugh laugh
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Nov 25, 2007 7:12 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
Some of the things about the UK...

-The British are reserved, which may cause them to appear cool and indifferent or overly formal. In fact, they are very friendly and helpful to foreigners.
-Shake hands with everyone present -- men, women, and children -- at business and social meetings. Shake hands again when leaving.
-Handshakes are light -- not firm.
-Women should extend their hand to men first.
-Use last names and appropriate titles until specifically invited by your British hosts or colleagues to use their first names.

-The British are not back slappers or touchers and generally do not display affection in public.
-Hugging, kissing and touching is usually reserved for family members and very close friends.
-The British like a certain amount of personal space. Do not stand too close to another person or put your arm around someone's shoulder.
-Staring is considered rude.
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Nov 25, 2007 7:13 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
We're used to plenty of room around us... laugh


I guess it's got to do with personal space and all that...
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Nov 25, 2007 7:14 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Dknew
DknewDknewBarrington, New Hampshire USA319 Threads 14 Polls 9,166 Posts
* Keep your distance when conversing. If an American feels you are standing too close, he or she may step back without even thinking about it.
* People who like to touch really like touching, and people who do not like to touch really dislike being touched. You will need to watch your colleagues for clues on what they are comfortable with.
* Americans are generally uncomfortable with same-sex touching, especially between males.
* Holding the middle finger up by itself is considered insulting and vulgar.
* Americans smile a great deal, even at strangers. They like to have their smiles returned.
* Men and women will sit with legs crossed at the ankles or knees, or one ankle crossed on the knee.
* Some Americans are known as "back slappers" -- they give others a light slap on the back to show friendship.
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Nov 25, 2007 7:14 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
haha Yep.. that's sounds about right.
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Nov 25, 2007 7:15 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
That's the one, yes.. laugh
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Nov 25, 2007 7:15 PM CST Cultural etiquette
roseofsharon
roseofsharonroseofsharonmanchester, Hampshire, England UK70 Threads 3 Polls 11,702 Posts
Yes, of course..... when in Rome and all that?? I travel to Italy a lot, they are a deeply religious people (Roman Catholic mostly). For example, when entering a church, chapel, cathedral, it is customary to cover up exposed flesh as in shoulders and upper legs. Now, I don't hold the same views as them re. religion, but I do abide by those wishes.

I have seen people in barely more than bikinis in these places.... its ignorant and disrespectful...!!

cheers
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Nov 25, 2007 7:16 PM CST Cultural etiquette
evie_girl_fl
evie_girl_flevie_girl_flFayetteville, North Carolina USA11 Threads 1,361 Posts
Darn if that is the case, then my Brittish Joe has been corrupted!! rolling on the floor laughing rolling on the floor laughing
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Nov 25, 2007 7:18 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Dknew
DknewDknewBarrington, New Hampshire USA319 Threads 14 Polls 9,166 Posts
* It is considered rude to stare, ask questions or otherwise bring attention to someone's disability.
* Smoking is very unpopular in the United States. Restaurants have separate smoking and nonsmoking sections. Public and private buildings may ban smoking except in designated areas. Some people do not allow smoking in their homes and will ask you to go outside if you want to have a cigarette. Never smoke anywhere without asking permission from everyone present.
* Names are not held as sacred in the United States. Someone may mispronounce your name and laugh a bit as they do it. Or someone may just call you by your given name if your family name is too difficult to pronounce.
* There are several common names and nicknames that are used by both men and women. Call the person's assistant to ask if you are unsure of his or her gender.
* "Please" and "thank you" are very important in the United States. Say "please" and "thank you" to everyone for even the smallest kindness. Americans say them regardless of rank or how much they are paying for something, and they expect others to do the same.
* Say "Pardon me" or "Excuse me" if you touch someone or even get close to someone. Americans also say this if they sneeze or cough or do not understand something someone has said.
* Americans often share things in casual conversation, even with strangers, that may seem shockingly private.
* Social conversation in the United States is light. There is a standard format for small talk. People ask brief questions and expect brief answers. Americans become uncomfortable when one person talks for any length of time in a social situation.
* If you feel uncomfortable with a question asked of you, simply smile and say, "In my country, that would be a strange question."
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Nov 25, 2007 7:18 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Oslojente
OslojenteOslojenteOlso, Oslo Norway202 Threads 1 Polls 6,962 Posts
I agree.. I've seen tourists being denied enterance to the Vatican (and other places) because of this.


-The Italians are generally not inhibited when interacting with the opposite sex. Flirtation is part of the spirit of life in Italy.
-Do not pour wine if you are a guest. This is considered "unfeminine" by Italians.


HIC!
wine drinking grin
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Nov 25, 2007 7:19 PM CST Cultural etiquette
Eupho
EuphoEuphoWild Wild South West, England UK66 Threads 14 Polls 8,969 Posts
* Holding the middle finger up by itself is considered insulting and vulgar.



What like this .l. ?

laugh wave
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Nov 25, 2007 7:21 PM CST Cultural etiquette
evie_girl_fl
evie_girl_flevie_girl_flFayetteville, North Carolina USA11 Threads 1,361 Posts
Definitely agree with all! rolling on the floor laughing
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by Oslojente (202 Threads)
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