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Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your ( Archived) (31)

Sep 26, 2008 5:12 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
mother tongue often, not at all?

I have three sisters, one in the US, and two in Holland.
We talk English to each other all the time.

I have Dutch neighbours we always talk Dutch.

I have not forgotten my mother tongue, read and write it, no problem.
I have however been told that I now speak old fashion Dutch.
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Sep 26, 2008 5:42 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
druidess6308
druidess6308druidess6308Aliquippa, Pennsylvania USA99 Threads 20,283 Posts
You should continue to speak your mother tongue when you have the opportunity. I see nothing wrong with that. Good for you, Jenny!
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Sep 26, 2008 5:46 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
Hugz_n_Kissez
Hugz_n_KissezHugz_n_KissezSomeplace, Ontario Canada82 Threads 3 Polls 34,865 Posts
It's suppose to be Mohawk but due to circumstances beyond my control and schools punishing kids for speaking it in my mother and fathers generation...my grandmother who was fluent refused to teach her kids the language so they would never have to go through that...so I know about 10 words of my own language which is sad due to government assimilation policies and the fact my Native school had no teacher to hire when I attended....I have tried to learn it since but to no avail...I am just not one to pick up on languages and my kids know more than I do...having taken it right from daycare on!!!!!!


So I speak English and that's it....wave wink hug teddybear hug bouquet
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Sep 26, 2008 6:14 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
druidess6308: You should continue to speak your mother tongue when you have the opportunity. I see nothing wrong with that. Good for you, Jenny!



No there is nothing wrong with speaking in my mother tongue.
Nobody to speak it with now.
It is just that I now think in English and have to think at times
how is this in Dutch again?
I read two Dutch newspapers so keep up that way.
So many new words have been added that I never learned.
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Sep 26, 2008 6:19 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
Hugz_n_Kissez: It's suppose to be Mohawk but due to circumstances beyond my control and schools punishing kids for speaking it in my mother and fathers generation...my grandmother who was fluent refused to teach her kids the language so they would never have to go through that...so I know about 10 words of my own language which is sad due to government assimilation policies and the fact my Native school had no teacher to hire when I attended....I have tried to learn it since but to no avail...I am just not one to pick up on languages and my kids know more than I do...having taken it right from daycare on!!!!!!So I speak English and that's it....



Yes that was the worsed thing ever done by the governement.
Scars that are still there today.
Don't know who's "bright" idea it was to come up with that one.
Re-educating the native people.

Now realizing what a loss is was to see so many of their languages
gone, some forever!
A blight on the Canadian governement for sure! crying
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Sep 26, 2008 6:37 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
phoenix
phoenixphoenixparis, Ile-de-France France103 Threads 4 Polls 5,247 Posts
hollandgirl: mother tongue often, not at all?

I have three sisters, one in the US, and two in Holland.
We talk English to each other all the time.

I have Dutch neighbours we always talk Dutch.

I have not forgotten my mother tongue, read and write it, no problem.
I have however been told that I now speak old fashion Dutch.


Hi sweetcheeks..

I've done it in reverse..I'm Irish and my mother toungue is English. But I live in France and today I speak, read and write French everyday but when I'm home 'chez moi'..everything is in English. And when ever I have friends around, it 'throws them' when ever they hear me speak english on the phone..or the radio is tuned into an english speaking station..

Also the people with limited english are always out to either impress or improve there command of english...Sometimes it can be a pain, especially when they mix the two together..

One very good point is because i speak french with an accent the girls find it very sexy.....
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Sep 26, 2008 6:38 PM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
The one thing I do in Dutch most of the time, is when I have to add a lot of figures.
On purpose I don't use my calculator.

When in English something is forty three, the Dutch say; three and forty.
I was the translater one time at a bingo game.
That was fun.........not.
After one hour I thought I has a pointed head.

I believe several languages turn the figures around.


professor
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Nov 9, 2008 2:27 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
Lionhearted1967
Lionhearted1967Lionhearted1967London, Ontario Canada184 Threads 12 Polls 13,762 Posts
Hugz_n_Kissez: It's suppose to be Mohawk but due to circumstances beyond my control and schools punishing kids for speaking it in my mother and fathers generation...my grandmother who was fluent refused to teach her kids the language so they would never have to go through that...so I know about 10 words of my own language which is sad due to government assimilation policies and the fact my Native school had no teacher to hire when I attended....I have tried to learn it since but to no avail...I am just not one to pick up on languages and my kids know more than I do...having taken it right from daycare on!!!!!!So I speak English and that's it....



I have got to laugh at this. I lived in Wisconsin for 12 years. I have met the natives and even got into some discussions with some of the female natives about how I felt that since I have some native blood myself that that doesn't take that spirit from me. They told me that if I did not speak the language I was therefore not a native. They keep their tongue as well have told me of the stories that are passed on from their cheifs. I may have not comprhended some of their stories, they DID understand them. I have a hard time believing that an indian culture would give their heritage up so easily. They speak their native tongue as easily as they speak English.


Sorry...don't get it????confused
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Nov 9, 2008 2:45 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
phoenix: Hi sweetcheeks..

I've done it in reverse..I'm Irish and my mother toungue is English. But I live in France and today I speak, read and write French everyday but when I'm home 'chez moi'..everything is in English. And when ever I have friends around, it 'throws them' when ever they hear me speak english on the phone..or the radio is tuned into an english speaking station..

Also the people with limited english are always out to either impress or improve there command of english...Sometimes it can be a pain, especially when they mix the two together..

One very good point is because i speak french with an accent the girls find it very sexy.....


Well hun you don't need that cute accent as your sexy this way already.
Lol I now speak Dutch with an English accent and visa versa.
The French also turn figures around like the Dutch do.
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Nov 9, 2008 2:51 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
I have Dutch neighbours we always talk Dutch.
Correction we never speak Dutch to each other.
You can have 30 Dutch together and they will all talk English.
Take for example Germans or Italian etc, they will as soon as a few meet, talk their native language.

I believe the Dutch don't is because they want to blend in.
There attitude is more like; I now live here so must adapt to my new country's ways. That includes the language.
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Nov 9, 2008 2:57 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
BarrenPneuma
BarrenPneumaBarrenPneumaGolden Staircase, Ontario Canada121 Threads 4 Polls 2,496 Posts
There is some importance to speaking one's mother tongue wherever you are, and I think it lies in the essence of culture. There are things and words, mannerisms, expressions and such that cannot translate into other languages quite so easily without losing their true point.
Try translating a joke from your mother tongue to the one common to your new environment? It often does not come across the same.
If you lose your tongue you lose an intrinsic part of not only yourself but that of your culture. The curse of Babylon in reverse is slowly desecrating our individuality and conforming us into a solid group of unilingular beings. Bland and static with no hope for future development. A tragedy in the making in my eyes, but then I do so Love words from all over the world and dearly miss each one as it fades into non-existence.
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Nov 9, 2008 3:09 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
Hugz_n_Kissez
Hugz_n_KissezHugz_n_KissezSomeplace, Ontario Canada82 Threads 3 Polls 34,865 Posts
Lionhearted1967: I have got to laugh at this. I lived in Wisconsin for 12 years. I have met the natives and even got into some discussions with some of the female natives about how I felt that since I have some native blood myself that that doesn't take that spirit from me. They told me that if I did not speak the language I was therefore not a native. They keep their tongue as well have told me of the stories that are passed on from their cheifs. I may have not comprhended some of their stories, they DID understand them. I have a hard time believing that an indian culture would give their heritage up so easily. They speak their native tongue as easily as they speak English. Sorry...don't get it????



They didn't give it up easily darlin it was stolen from them...at least those families whose kids were forced to attend residential schools...where they were beaten for speaking their own language..or practicing their own culture....it wasn't stolen from the adults it was stolen from the children who were forced to attend residential schools from the age of 5 - 16.....wave wave wink roll eyes dunno hug
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Nov 9, 2008 3:22 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
BarrenPneuma: There is some importance to speaking one's mother tongue wherever you are, and I think it lies in the essence of culture. There are things and words, mannerisms, expressions and such that cannot translate into other languages quite so easily without losing their true point.
Try translating a joke from your mother tongue to the one common to your new environment? It often does not come across the same.
If you lose your tongue you lose an intrinsic part of not only yourself but that of your culture. The curse of Babylon in reverse is slowly desecrating our individuality and conforming us into a solid group of unilingular beings. Bland and static with no hope for future development. A tragedy in the making in my eyes, but then I do so Love words from all over the world and dearly miss each one as it fades into non-existence.


Barren your so right about jokes and certain sayings they can not be translated without losing some or all of its meaning.
I will never lose my first language, besides Dutch I know the dialect that even my Dutch husband did not understand. Something like English and Gaelic, so different.
I keep up with my language and the dialect by tuning in to the programs that speak both.
All the Dutch people that I know do not speak their first language any longer for the reasons stated earlier.
I think, dream in English.
Then there is the Africaner language that I can read and understand but not speak.
A smattering of German completes my knowledge of foreign languages.
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Nov 9, 2008 3:28 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
Dutch is truly a tuty fruty of many languages.
French was used by the middle class during the golden age of Holland the 17-18th century.
Today there are so many French words left that most people don't recognize them as French any longer.

German, Jidish, English, French, Italian, Spanish as Holland was at war with Spain for 80 years, are all part of the Dutch language.
help
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Nov 9, 2008 3:29 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
foreveryoung1
foreveryoung1foreveryoung1cartagena, Murcia Spain4 Threads 1 Polls 4,094 Posts
I am the other way around, born in an English speaking country and now live in a Spanish speaking country, but always speak English at home.
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Nov 9, 2008 3:56 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
hollandgirl
hollandgirlhollandgirlSomewhere in Canada. B.C., British Columbia Canada711 Threads 6,072 Posts
Carol have you also learned the Spanish language?
Holland is small but has two official language and many dialects.
My husband did not know a dialect.
Strange, those who speak a dialect, keep speaking it a lot more.
I have a program where I can only join in when using the dialect.
This particular dialect only spoken in the North, is not taught at school.
You pick it up on the street etc. I was amazed when first reading it while in Canada, that I could read it because as I said it was not learned. While in Holland I had learned to understand it more than speak it. Now found I could read it too
My mother did not allow it spoken at home.
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Nov 9, 2008 4:00 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
foreveryoung1
foreveryoung1foreveryoung1cartagena, Murcia Spain4 Threads 1 Polls 4,094 Posts
hollandgirl: Carol have you also learned the Spanish language?
Holland is small but has two official language and many dialects.
My husband did not know a dialect.
Strange, those who speak a dialect, keep speaking it a lot more.
I have a program where I can only join in when using the dialect.
This particular dialect only spoken in the North, is not taught at school.
You pick it up on the street etc. I was amazed when first reading it while in Canada, that I could read it because as I said it was not learned. While in Holland I had learned to understand it more than speak it. Now found I could read it too
My mother did not allow it spoken at home.


Yes, I speak Spanish amonst several other languages:
teddybear:
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Nov 9, 2008 4:28 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
Sommerauer71
Sommerauer71Sommerauer71Salzburg, Austria164 Threads 4 Polls 19,249 Posts
I was born in Ireland, English is my mother tongue, I was educated in Belgium where I was taught English as a second language, whilst I have a British dialect, I have no regional dialect.

I now live in Austria, teach English as a second language and I speak German with a British accent...

The dialects where I live here, I have picked up, it is natural but reading and writing, I practice High German.
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Nov 9, 2008 4:42 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
Hugz_n_Kissez
Hugz_n_KissezHugz_n_KissezSomeplace, Ontario Canada82 Threads 3 Polls 34,865 Posts
I'll tell ya one thing right now...I am gettin the f outta Canada and my kids too...I don't want then around biggotted a**hole that have no respect for who they are or a desire to learn about who they are....thumbs up
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Nov 9, 2008 4:44 AM CST Those of us born in another country but now live in an English speaking country, do you speak your
morgan5
morgan5morgan5chelmsford, Essex, England UK100 Threads 13,444 Posts
When i lived in Turkey during the winter time rarely spent time with people able to speak English fluently,

in Malta its very different everyone speaks English
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