0 Variables

If you cannot explain what your test measures in one word, you should choose "0 Variables".
For example, if your quiz is called "Is your boyfriend cheating on you", then you are not measuring a variable (cheating-ness would not make sense!).

1 Variable

a) 1 variable with 1 name
If you can explain what your test measures in one word, then you should choose "1 Variable with 1 name".
For example, on a quiz called "How lazy are you?", the 1 variable you would be measuring is "laziness". Most often the variable-name will have a "ness" at the end of it.




b) 1 variable with 2 names
If you are measuring 1 variable that has 2 extremes (that cannot be explained with one word), then you should choose "1 Variable with 2 names".
For example, on a quiz called "Are you a democrat or republican", the 1 variable you would be measuring would have 2 names "Democrat" and "Republican".


0 Variables vs 1 Variables

The only difference between 1 Variable quiz and 0 Variable quiz is:
1 Variable quiz: the Taker's score will include the variable name... for example "30% laziness".
0 Variable quiz: the Taker's score would just be "30%".

More-than-1-Variable (not recommended)

A multi-variable quiz is complicated and not recommended unless you are an experienced quiz maker. A multi-variable quiz is like creating several quizzes all in one.

For example, let's say you have a quiz called "How shy are you?" (which measures "shyness"), and another quiz called "How lonley are you?" (which measures "lonliness"). You could combine these two quizzes into one quiz, that measures the 2 variables: "shyness" and "lonliness".

QUESTIONS
You would write questions to test both "shyness" and "lonliness" at the same time, and/or write questions that test one or the other. You would do this by assigning each answer a separate point value for "shyness" and for "lonliness".

Sample question that tests 2 variables at the same time:
Do you prefer to stay home on Saturday nights?" a. Yes (2 points shyness, 1 point lonliness) b. No . This question would test both variables at the same time.

Sample question that tests only 1 variable at a time: "Are you often quiet in social situtations?", one of the possible answers could be "yes", and you could assign it 2 points shyness, 0 points lonliness. This question would only test shyness, but not lonliness.

SCORING
Multi-Variable scoring is more complicated than 1-Variable scoring.

On a 1-Variable quiz for "shyness" you might have the following scoring ranges:
0-50 = very shy
51-100 = not very shy

On a 1-Variable quiz for "lonliness" you might have the following scoring ranges:
0-50 = very lonely
51-100 = not very lonely

But for the 2-Variable quiz, you must come up with the combination of the scoring ranges:
0-50 shyness, 0-50 lonliness = very shy, very lonely
0-50 shyness, 51-100 lonliness = very shy, not very lonely
51-100 shyness, 0-50 lonliness = not very shy, not very lonely
51-100 shyness, 51-100 lonliness = not very shy, very lonely


You are required to write text to describe each one of these scoring ranges (and each combination of ranges), so you end up writing much more text for multi-variable quizzes.

Be aware that the more variables you test for and the more scoring ranges you assign, the more complicated a multi-variable quiz becomes.